Bright Side
NewPopular
Inspiration
Creativity
Wonder

8 Signs You Are Suffering From Depression Without Even Knowing About It

Get notifications
It took me a long time to realize my diet, although not horrible, was causing worsened anxiety and migraines. I also had a vitamin D deficiency and my magnesium was fairly low. We were not designed to put junk into our bodies. Why put terrible things in without expecting bad health, fatigue, dehydration, mood swings, or constant blahness? I can find myself extra blah when I eat too much sugar or processed foods. I do take a migraine preventative that greatly improved my sleep quality. It mildly helps with anxiety but not nearly as much as anti-depressants, which made me feel flat. I do not recommend anyone stopping their medications, but why make them work so much harder by putting in junk that lowers serotonin or dopamine? You don’t have to eat salad every meal but just swap out a few things that aren’t helping. Pick the frozen fruit (grapes or blueberries are AMAZING frozen and other berries are vey good for you) over the dessert or chips. Add turmeric to meals to help with inflammation. Try swapping your spaghetti noodles for the veggie ones. Eat more sweet potatoes over regular. Roasted sweet potatoes don’t need much seasoning to taste incredible. I do eat a lot of salad and pay attention to the dressing I use, but I could definitely branch out vegetable wise. I am learning different ways to cook things to get my husband to eat them too. I also have to actively force myself to stay hydrated.
-
-
Reply
I think i have depression
-
-
Reply
This is full on offensive. If you're suffering with depression YOU KNOW. Stop appropriating the word, it doesn't mean sad, it doesn't mean burned out, it's a debilitating mental illness.
-
-
Reply
There is still human nature to not admit that something is “wrong.” I definitely deal with debilitating mental illnesses, so know I only speak of it because I actually understand. I am in my early 30s and was raised to hide what you’re going through, that people are mean and judgemental. That no one needs to know your business. Although meaning well, my parents did not show me how to deal with things. I was not equipped to understand my anxiety, to be open with people, to not think I’m a complete weirdo for seeming so drastically different than everyone else. No, my parents did not tell me I was weird, I just assumed everyone thought that. I am glad that society is turning more to being open. I think that there will always be someone that doesn’t understand something, how they feel, how to express it. Sure, people confuse being sad with being depressed, but there are people that use different words for the same thing. Someone may truly be wondering why they feel down, what is the cause, am I abnormal, am i worth anything to anyone else? They may not think that they would label themselves as depressed, “crazy,” in need of some kind of help. For a long time you didn’t tell anyone you had a therapist or psychiatrist. You didn’t tell anyone you were gay, didn’t want to do what others thought you should, didn’t learn differently than others. We have come a long way from the days of throwing someone with special needs in an institution, from treating dementia patents like they are just wasted space, from bullying being the same as “well you just can’t be weak/it teaches character.” I think helping people be aware that there are signs to things is not necessarily negative. It starts a discussion. It is important to open a dialogue. It is important to know you are worth the time someone put into making a post. Labels aren’t the worst thing- it’s the connotation or how someone is treated after coming to a realization. What is next? That next step, knowing you are worth taking the time to find ways to breathe a little easier, that matters.
-
-
Reply