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What Happens If You Let Your Child Eat Dessert Before the Main Course

Children’s increased preference for sweet foods and drinks is universal among toddlers around the world. Most parents know that a lot of kids are fixated on that tasty treat they often get after the main course, but, good news: eating dessert before that course might actually have some benefits.

The Bright Side team did some research and gathered a few reasons why letting your kids eat dessert first can turn out to be a good thing.

It teaches them responsibility.

Sweets can be an important part of a healthy diet and they bring a lot of joy to children. As a parent, serving dessert to kids helps neutralize its importance, and it ends up becoming just another part of the meal, instead of something glorious, that they rarely eat.

It may help with weight loss.

According to a recent study, it has been found that eating dessert first, instead of having it after the main course, may actually lead to weight loss. It was shown that, when participants had a filling dessert at the beginning of the meal, they ate less after eating the sweet dish.

It can help them make healthier choices.

Research published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology has found that indulging in dessert before the main course could lead to healthier eating overall. The reasoning behind this is, when eating a healthy meal first, you look forward to that delicious dessert, but if you’ve already satisfied your sweet tooth beforehand, you end up having something healthier and lighter.

It could put them (and you) in a better mood.

It’s no surprise that people crave desserts — they can positively influence our mood. Kids can sometimes act up while eating their veggies and waiting for their dessert. So, serving it first can make lunch and dinner time a lot less stressful for the whole family. Recent studies also suggest that those who prefer sweets are more likely to be friendly and compassionate.

Do you enjoy sweets? How often do your kids get to have dessert?

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