Comments to article «10 Peculiar Things About the German Lifestyle That Will Astonish Any Visitor»

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A lot of these, if not all, are true in most European countries.
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yes! #3 for example, it's true for everyone home in Spain I've been in
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True that. Almost everything above is in Slovenia aswell.
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Yep, in France many families also don't store milk and eggs in fridges. Even in the stores they stay on normal shelves
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It seems that you don't know anything about my country, Jordan.
we have aii these things except the eggs outside the fridge.
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Germans neither have their milk, nor their eggs outside of the fridge! Ever!
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that's weird, because I often come to visit my German friend, and she stores her milk in her basement (she buys in bulks). She only stores opened cartons of milk in her fridge, the rest stays downstairs 🤔
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#8 is so interesting 😇😇😇
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Holy S, where do I start?
So much in this article is simply rubbish!
Fridges have a normal size. Small fridges are in small apartments, and are much more in common in the UK than in Germany. Even built-in fridges are the big ones, with a usually 3-drawers refrigerator on the bottom. I actually can’t remember any household I visited having a small fridge, apart from the one I moved into, and a big fridge was the first I purchased.
Germans WEAR a bath suit in public. Who the F came up with that?! There are very few designated beaches where you are allowed to be naked, but a public bath?! Come on! (The only thing where we are in fact naked is a sauna/steam room.) Unisex changing rooms? Yes: cubicles, with a lock, for one person! Group changing rooms are either female or male. So are showers etc. Quiet hours don’t exist anymore, for YEARS! And blinds outside the window? They exist, but are rare and not on „most windows“. We don’t keep milk in the freezer? Long life milk is for most Germans in the cupboard for emergencies. We prefer buying fresh milk like anyone else. Hence, we put them in a freezer. So most of us do with eggs, by the way.

Who did this research? Does the author even know where to find Germany on a map?

Some real facts: if you own a dog in Germany, you have to tax it. There is also a tax on rain (which is stupid, I agree). The washing-machine is usually in the bath room, never in the kitchen. Double glased windows are the standard. There are no door knockers, we only have bells. Public transport is indeed so on time, that the time tables (unlike in London where it states the bus comes every 6-8 minutes) show the exact minute (!) when the bus is expected to arrive, and you will see it coming around the corner 30 seconds before the scheduled time. Homeschooling is illegal. If you have mould in your apartment it’s most likely your fault, as every one knows how to prevent it. And: you are allowed to redecorate rented property: paining walls, changing flooring, putting nails into the walls, expressing yourself. Animals are usually allowed. Smoke alarms are mandatory for years, not just in rented but also in owned properties.
Flat or houseshares outside university time are very uncommon. People rather live alone in a small flat than with strangers in a bigger house.
Everyone in the UK bragging about they have done a First Aid course: In Germany everyone applying for a driving licence must physically attend a two day First Aid Course, otherwise they won’t get the licence.

And you are talking about our fridges being too small 🙀
#researchbeforepublishing
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thanks for some clarifications :)
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In my family we also lock the door from the inside with the key, always. Many our friends think it's weird but we are just used to do so :)
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