I Repeat, I Am Not Giving Up My Airplane Seat

People
year ago

It can be tricky to know how to respond to an uncomfortable situation, especially when they come out of nowhere and could affect others. We recently received a letter from one of our readers who felt overwhelmed by guilt. We want to share some advice that we think might help her out.

Thank you for sharing your story. Here are some thoughts that may help you frame it better.

  • It can be difficult to know what to do when faced with a situation like the one you describe, where you have saved for first-class seats and then encounter a woman with a crying baby who wants to switch seats.
  • It’s understandable that you and Jessica wanted to protect your investment and have a comfortable and peaceful trip. Moreover, the fact that you’re still thinking about the situation long after it had occurred, showcases how mature and thoughtful you are.
  • We would like to remind you that small acts of kindness can make a big difference in someone’s day. While you and your friend had every right to keep your seats, it’s worth considering whether there might have been a way to offer some kind of accommodation to the woman with the baby.
  • It might have been helpful to offer to switch seats with her for part of the flight or give her some of your in-flight amenities. These small gestures might not have fixed the problem entirely, but they could have shown that you were willing to be understanding and compassionate. This would have helped to alleviate some of the woman’s stress.
  • The most crucial thing in circumstances like this is to make an effort to be sympathetic and understanding. Being kind may go a long way because we’re all in this together.
  • But don’t forget, it’s totally okay to put yourself first and make decisions that prioritize your own needs and well-being, even if they’re not super popular or widely accepted. Taking care of ourselves, including setting boundaries and making choices that support our own happiness and well-being, is super important.
  • We’re proud of you and your friend for staying true to yourselves and beliefs. But in the future, we encourage you to approach such situations with empathy and understanding for the needs, feelings, and perspectives of others.

How would you respond if you were in that position?

Comments

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HHHHHWHAT?!???!! This is AWFUL advice. OP owes this person NOTHING and suggesting they should 'accomodate' this selfish and opportunistic woman is COMPLETELY unfair. No, she SHOULDNT trade for a lil while; WHAT?!!! WHY would she?! This lady doesn't get to pick her seat AFTER booking, she should've paid for that 'amenity' if it were THAT important to her. Poppycock advice, BS and SHAME for making OP feel like they are ANYTHING but 100% in the right.

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There are some people who will use their crying babies to get a better seats. Whereever they are seating, the baby will cry if it wants to...
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I don't believe they allow crying babies in First Class, but assuming this is true. Sarah you don't have to give your seat to anyone. When my son was 7 months old I traveled to Germany it was a 10 hour flight and I would have never dare to ask someone for a different seat. People will abuse if you let them.

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The baby will cry wherever it is seated.. maybe it just need a diaper change, gassy or uncomfortable with the pressure in the cabin. So changing the seat is not the solution. The mother should ask the cabin crew to help her out as the crying will disturb all passengers.

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