Illustrator Reimagines Disney Characters With Realistic Body Types

Films
4 weeks ago

Get ready for a magical, whimsical shakeup! Artist Wyethe Smallish waved her wand, sprinkling body-positive fairy dust on Disney characters. The results? A delightful, diverse collection of full-figured princes and princesses that challenge old-school beauty standards. Let's take a look!

1. Cinderella

Different body types exist and some women can have that figure, not to mention it's stylized , like seriously not everyone has a belly

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Our beloved glass-slipper-losing princess has a few more curves to show off. Wearing her gorgeous gown, she proves you don't need a dainty figure to be the belle of the ball!

2. Ariel

This little mermaid’s got a fuller tail and a bold attitude. No more stick-thin princesses for the under-the-sea kingdom! Ariel’s ready to explore new depths of self-confidence and body acceptance.

3. Belle

The brainy bookworm just became the poster child for fuller-bodied beauty. Flaunting her stunning yellow gown, Belle shows you can be brilliant and beautiful, regardless of your dress size.

4. Rapunzel

Letting down her luscious locks, Rapunzel stuns us with her new princess look. Who says you need a slender figure to climb a tower of confidence?

5. Jasmine

Our Arabian princess is flying high on her magic carpet, rocking a fuller-bodied look. Dressed in her iconic turquoise outfit, Jasmine’s proving you don’t need a slender figure to rule the kingdom and charm a street-rat-turned-prince!

6. Prince Eric

I am glad that most of the men I know never looked at these cartoons to be realistic.

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Even the fellas are getting a makeover! Prince Eric’s fuller physique shows you don’t need a lean, royal body to save the day.

7. Princess Aurora

I mean she was eating good, so I can see her with a little meat on her bones

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Once upon a dream, this sleeping beauty woke up to a world where all body types are celebrated! Trading her petite frame for a fuller figure, Aurora shows us you don’t need to be stick-thin to enchant kingdoms or charm dashing princes.

8. Meg

This Greek goddess is showing the world that true heroines come in all sizes! Swapping her slender figure for a fuller, more realistic one, Meg proves you don’t need to be stick-thin to save the day and stand up to the gods.

9. Princess Tiana

Y'all this one's good they look basically the same and she can still make me bengeis can't spell the fluffy dough with sugar

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This ambitious, hard-working princess is cooking up something new! Trading her petite frame for a fuller figure, Tiana's showing us that body diversity is the key ingredient in any successful fairy tale. Dressed in her elegant green gown, she's proof that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes – and that true success starts with believing in yourself and embracing your unique beauty.

10. Elsa

Actually decent. Probably the shape would be a little different if she was wearing structured clothing or a corset, however.

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The icy queen is heating things up with her empowering new look! Exchanging her slender figure for a curvier one, Elsa’s teaching us that true beauty is not defined by size. Dressed in her enchanting blue gown, she shows us that confidence and self-acceptance can conquer any frozen heart, reminding us to let go of outdated beauty standards and embrace the magic of body diversity.

11. Mulan

This warrior princess has swapped her slim figure for a curvier, more realistic one, proving that body diversity is as strong as any sword. Mulan’s strength, determination, and newfound voluptuousness show us that heroines come in all shapes and sizes — and that true courage comes from within.

12. Belle And Adam

She was pretty poor, so probably in between. I have no idea how the curse would effect Adam's body.

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While Belle dazzles in her iconic yellow gown, showing that intelligence and beauty come in all shapes and sizes, Adam’s now a fuller-bodied prince, teaching us that happily-ever-after doesn’t depend on a lean, royal physique. Together, they’re challenging stereotypes and inspiring us to embrace love and acceptance, proving that true beauty lies within.

Wyethe Smallish's whimsical, witty work encourages us to embrace diversity in all forms, shattering narrow beauty ideals. With these charming characters, she's making fairy tales more relatable and inspiring us to love the skin we're in. While Disney is changing the game, what does it mean for real-world relationships? We'll be diving into why some men find curvier figures so appealing in our next piece!

Comments

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For the most part all they did was give them double chins, fatter faces, and fatter bodies...Yes the original designs of some of these characters are unrealistic but the "Realistic Makeover" went further past Realistic and straight to chubby / chunky. Almost as if skinny people or other body types just don't exist? Sorry I'm just a bit tired of people simply calling these makeovers "Realistic" but only presenting chunkier frames instead of Realistic varieties.

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4 weeks ago
This broke our hearts, so we had to delete it.
4 weeks ago
The comment was deleted. Go home guys.
4 weeks ago
This comment got punished.
3 weeks ago
Oops. We didn't mean to delete it. It just happened.
2 weeks ago
This is so personal that we just can't show it to you.

As an artist, myself, I can tell you that this whole thing was for "show" and not actually reimagining these princesses with 'realistic' bodies. Firstly, Disney already did that. They have realistic proportions to the animated style. Secondly, Elsa, Cinderella and Rapunzel were wearing corsets so the belly roles wouldn't have been visible. Thirdly, you just made Ariel, Meg and Eric chunky to virtue signal. You didn't "reimagine" anything. You took someone's work (that the artists spent hours on and likely didn't get paid their worth), and f'ed it up to make yourself look like a good person. Go do something original before you call yourself an artist.

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4 weeks ago
No comment? Pass the wine, please.
3 weeks ago
A cleaning lady accidentally wiped away this comment.

For someone attempting to include "all body types," You sure did a great job of eliminating every single slimmer body type. Making all the characters larger doesn't make it more inclusive than making all the characters slim.

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4 weeks ago
Nobody. Should. See. This. Comment.
3 weeks ago
We took this comment away to our comment museum.

If we are talking about health concerns, and that it's okay to shame larger people for their overweight bodies; we should shame those who are all bones. Those who have no muscles, those who's stomachs and intestines have shrunken to the point they might rupture something with a full meal.

All of the original images were emancipated if we were to apply realistic standards to them which is the whole point of the article. We can debate if they should be applied to something stylized another time.

So, from a concerned health perspective, they should be shamed. After all, weight is not a health matter to be between a doctor and patient. No it should be between everyone.

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4 weeks ago
This comment is too shy. It's hiding.

They weren't even trying to vary body types, and just made them closer to plus size. You focused on only that body type and didn't even get it through your brain that slim people do exist. And the reason why most princesses had slimmer waists is because of the tight clothes and corsets.

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I respectfully disagree. I was just about to to applaud that the artist did experiment with varying degrees from thin to curvy.

But in all cases there was room for internal organs.

If fantasy is at play here, then let's leave OUT the corset, shall we, and err on the side of healthy body images for our children.

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3 weeks ago
This comment was too dangerous for society.

Only 5 images were plus sized. They were all a variety of different shapes, and many of them still were slim. They just gave space for organs.

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If you looked like any of the original images yes. However I highly doubt you did, and are just used to seeing a waist smaller than ones head because thats the standard media representation. Resulting in it looking normal to you and ignoring that lack of realism (which is fair, this is a cartoon. Things are normally exaggerated in them.) And since it's normalized in your mind you equate it to what you look like. And theres nothing wrong with that. That's how cartoons are MEANT to be seen.

That's why this isnt "if they weren't skinny" but "realistic" its toning down the cartoonist exaggeration to be more in line with body proportions.

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The fact that some of those princesses didn't even need a realistic body. Like Rapunzel was a more normal body shape than the older disney movies but, then again she was wearing a corset 🤷‍♀️

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Was she?
I agree it would have been nice if the images made sure to account for the ones wearing corsets though.

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"Body diversity is the key ingredient to all successful fairy tales"? Really? They are fairy tales. There's a reason they don't make whimsical children's movies about Bertha the girthy postal worker.

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3 weeks ago
No comment – no problem.

I shamed myself because I didn’t have an athletic body like Pocahontas or the movement control of Esmeralda. I shamed myself for not having blue eyes or Nani’s hips or Moana’s muscles. I felt seen by Jane’s tiny figure, Pocahontas’s hair, Mulans skinny body trying to become stronger…

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Lol seriously?? I never did that bc my daddy taught me those are cartoon bodies! He taught me to eat right and get fresh air and play outside.

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Right, so you were taught better. Unfortunately many of us didn't have parents who were able to swoop in and say "no no, that's not realistic you shouldn't compare yourself."
Which I'm not going to blame the media wholey for parents not doing theur jobs; but it is where the problem was introduced.

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2 weeks ago
HULK DELETE THIS COMMENT!

Just to play devils advocate, these Disney princesses are old, very old, on the technical and animation front we have some things to consider. Early animation techniques required clear, simple shapes that could be consistently and easily animated by hand. The slender waists made it easier for animators to create fluid movements and maintain consistency across thousands of frames. Also, nowadays, thicker framed people are more common as most of America is considered obese, childhood obesity in particular is on the rise as never seen before. Only about 1.6% of the adults in the US are thin framed, so yea, this reimagining is actually a more accurate representation of what most kids will see in todays population. The princesses look cool, don't know why everybody seems to be so negative in comments, why everyone so angry 😂
Thanks to the artist who made these, they are very interesting. I have observed people who have a bit more meat on the bones tend to be less comfortable in their bodies (especially being bombarded with advertisements of women primarily being very thin supermodels most movie stars, etc...) We should all aim to support each other on our journeys despite personal experiences and especially if we have the same experiences. 🙏🕊️💜

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2 weeks ago
Nothing will stay buried forever, apart from this comment.
3 weeks ago
One simply does not let this comment remain here.

so what I'm learning is that we're all too lazy to work out so instead we're reanimating pretty people to make ourselves feel better.... yeah that's great

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You do realize that weight and body size doesn't always have to do with whether or not someone exercises right? Your weight depends upon a multitude of different factors, and just because someone looks overweight that doesn't mean they don't exercise and/or overeat.

Some people are too busy with other things and either don't have time to work out or they're too exhausted from all the things they've done and don't have the energy to workout.

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3 weeks ago
This comment was eaten by a raccoon.
3 weeks ago
The comment has hidden itself outside our galaxy.
3 weeks ago
You can't see a comment that isn't there.
3 weeks ago
The comment is deleted. The party is over.

I would have liked to see more variety, different body shapes; hourglass, pear, apple, inverted pear, where they are big on top and smaller towards the bottom, etc.

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2 weeks ago
This comment came alive and ran away.

There are exactly 5 images that are "plus sized"

Cinderella 2.
Ariel 2
Jasmine 4
Eric.
Meg.

The rest is just giving proper space into the body to have proper developed muscles, bones, and organs.

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3 weeks ago
The comment didn't pass the sanity test.

So thin/very thin people are not realistic?
Then I guess this past week I've seen at least 5 fake women, with their super small, tight waists and all...
FAKE!!!!!!!!!

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They are realistic, and some of the redone images DO show thin. But having no stomach or lower intestines aren't realistic.

At best the lower stomach should be flat, for an unhealthy body, not curved in (where are the liver, kidneys, stomach, and intestinal tract sitting?
That's what this is trying to fix.

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2 weeks ago
Was there a comment here?
3 weeks ago
Can't find the comment? Ask your mom.

I see maybe four pictures that would be considered "realistic body sizes". Cinderella was fine as is, since it's meant to show how miss treated and malnourished she was, due to her step family. Mulan, it made sense to make her more muscular, she's a warrior. Everyone in the Disney world (aside from Cinderella) would be a more normal body shape with a range from 5 - 15 more pounds added. Of course this is a range depending on background, and way of life. Of course some of the members could be much heavier than this as well. For example, Jasmine lived in the castle her whole life, it's not like there is exercise equipment around, she could have definitely been heavier life her father. This is also true for Rapunzel. Realistically, there should be body shapes for the princess ranging from the original photo of Cinderella all the way up to Ursula from the little mermaid.

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2 weeks ago
This comment space is on lease.

My question is, why are people bothered by cartoons? Be how you wan, but leave the movies and kids cartoons alone good grief. Like another comment said... WHO CARES!!

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Exactly artist should have design freedom and it's not like a four year old would look at Elsa and wonder why they don't look the same

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You made them all plus sizes. A little meat in the bones but Meg in Hercules was ridiculous

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3 weeks ago
The comment has left, but promises to come back.

Not all. About 5 images were.
Meg was the best because in ancient Greek larger figures were considered more attractive. A sign of wealth.
She was the most realistic because, provided we want to depict her as attractive to the culture the story is from, at that time period, a large woman is more attractive.

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2 weeks ago
Big Brother is watching you.

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