13 Stories About What Can Happen If a Child Grows Up in a Really Wealthy Family

3 years ago

While some people struggle to make ends meet, others complain about boring resorts and expensive cars. However, growing up in a wealthy family can be quite challenging. These children can’t go anywhere they like, and their future is often determined from their birth.

At Bright Side, we read stories about people who had grown up in really rich families. And they prove the fact that money can’t buy happiness.

  • My parents are billionaires. My father is an heir to a distinguished company in the hotel business. My mother was born into an old-money family. I do not know for sure how much money they have since they have never discussed that with me. From the moment I was born, I was able to have anything that I desired. Growing up was easy and really nice. We have a staff, including gardeners, maids, cooks, butlers, security, etc. and I do not remember a time when we did not. For the main part of my childhood, I was “raised” by these people. Like many other children of wealthy parents, I remember my childhood as being slightly lonely. My father wouldn’t be home 3 out of 4 weeks, and my mother was attending to her obligations. Being the offspring of 2 billionaires, in a way, is very scary. You’re always afraid of being kidnapped. It’s not paranoia, it’s the truth. It’s possible and it could happen. I’ve always had a security team. Whenever I go out of the house, my security follows. It’s something that you have to live with, the idea that there might be people out there who want to harm you because of your parents. © unknown author / Quora

  • My wife came from a wealthy family. Her father was the CEO of a large company for over 25 years. My mother-in-law is one of the most miserable people I know. I can only take her for 2-3 hours at a time. Usually, she makes one too many comments that she unknowingly directs toward people of my upbringing, the working class. I’ve never seen someone with so much to complain about. Most of the children in the family (4, my wife included) are heavy on the complaining. Her brother is a real piece of work though, easily the most spoiled of the 4. He’s in his late 20s, still lives at home. His dad knows he didn’t stand a chance of getting the job he saw himself working so he started a company and gave the kid a job. The other 2 siblings are nice but, like I said, they complain a lot and nothing ever seems to be good enough for them. © mr_irwin_fletcher / Reddit

  • My brother’s ex-girlfriend was from a really wealthy family. It was her birthday and my brother gave her a bunch of roses and some perfume (he was a student and had a part-time job). She looked at him, then at his present, and asked why he hadn’t bought her the ring that she had shown to him earlier (appx. $2,000). He replied that he didn’t have money for those things, but that when he had the proper income, he would definitely buy her everything she wanted. She asked, “How come you don’t have money? How can it be that a man doesn’t have money? Go and earn some.” After that conversation, their relationship withered. She felt offended and told their friends that he was a miser. © Vikki96 / Pikabu

  • I went to high school with a ton of rich kids. One girl, in particular, seemed to have it all. She was thin, tall, beautiful, dressed nice, drove a Porsche, had friends, and got good grades. But she lacked all common sense. One day she comes in saying she stole her mom’s emerald bracelet because she wouldn’t let her wear it. She was flaunting those dark green jewels to everyone. Fast forward a couple of classes into the day, now she’s saying the bracelet fell off and she can’t find it. Says it’s going to “teach her mother a lesson” for not letting her wear it and that her mother will just “have to buy a new one.” When I was 15 or so, I ended up losing a bracelet my mother bought me as a birthday gift a few years prior. That bracelet was $40, which was a lot of money for my mother to spend on a gift. I was used to not getting anything for my birthday. I searched for that bracelet until dawn broke and I finally found it. Some things just can’t be replaced. © laughing-tree / Reddit

  • There is this girl named Alice who has wealthy parents. She spends all of her time in clubs, at parties, and shopping. She is 17 years old. She decided to ask her father for an apartment in the city center for her birthday. Throughout the year, she was hinting that she wanted to get the “coveted keys,” “her own space,” etc. On her birthday, she received a nice box with keys inside from her father. The next morning, she found out that these were the keys to their house, and one tiny key was for a wooden barn behind the house. Like, here’s your personal space, daughter, here are your keys. When you’re ready to move out, go figure out how to earn money by yourself. © kosmobrick / Pikabu

  • I have a friend, we’ve known each other since childhood. She is from a very rich family. Everyone thinks that she can easily get anything she wants, but I know how hard it is for her sometimes. It seems like her father doesn’t love her at all, he scolds her and insults her. He always makes decisions for her. Like, she was fond of ballroom dance, it was her life, but he made her quit because she “couldn’t cope with her studies.” You know, my family maybe isn’t rich, but I always decided for myself what I wanted to become. Now my friend’s father wants her to go to Moscow and go to college there. And I know that she doesn’t want that at all. He just wants it for the sake of prestige. © _Hanna04 / Twitter

  • My fiancé was telling me a story about the “exchange students” that lived with them and how they were so nice and would help take care of the house. I asked him why his exchange students stayed with them for so long, when all my high school exchange student friends had only stayed for a semester. It was at that moment that he realized he grew up with Swiss nannies. © CiegoTigre / Reddit

  • It’s so lonely to grow up in a rich family. My parents are constantly working, and I hardly spend any time with them, let alone see them. And whenever they are around, their adult friends are always around with them because they are always hosting some type of party. I’m 14 years old, and my friends are non-existent. I go to a very exclusive and expensive private school, and the people there are all the same. You see, if I had it bad, I would actually have the motivation to work hard and try my best, but since I know that my bank account will always be there to save me, I don’t have to worry about anything. I don’t find any joy in life. It’s practically impossible to find happiness in life if nothing is challenging. I’ve been on so many vacations that I’ve become sick of them. Every weekend, we’re either traveling here or there, and it’s so constant that it’s become no fun anymore. © unknown author / Quora

  • I teach teens whose father makes millions a year. They were very upset that a doctor only makes $200k a year and they weren’t sure that was enough to live on comfortably. We did the math one day and realized he makes more in a day than a minimum wage earner does in a year. To be fair, it’s pretty hard to understand how money works when everything is done for you. Most of the kids I’ve taught have no concept of income and cost of living. © Shutterstormphoto / Reddit

  • I’m the firstborn in a reasonably wealthy family. I’ve traveled a lot. I literally had no restrictions on my life. I remember threatening a little girl and nobody stopped me, even after she complained to her parents. I tried to drive when I was 10 and crashed my car into the gate. That just became a funny story for my grandparents and my mother to tell everybody. Growing up wealthy turned me into a bit of a sociopath and we aren’t even super-rich. I can only imagine how some real rich kids turned out. © blackestsoul / Reddit

  • I was not raised by my parents. I am not sure if it was because my parents were too rich to be bothered or if there was another reason. I was raised by a very good woman who I called Ma and a man who was an idiot who I called Dad. I thought everyone got tons of gifts for Christmas and their birthdays. I thought everyone went on a spectacular vacation every year and stayed in fancy hotels. But for some reason I had to go to bed way earlier than the neighborhood kids, I was not allowed to have junk food like others and I was not allowed to go over anyone’s house, except certain selected friends and family. I never learned how to cook or clean. Ma refused to teach me to drive. I was supposed to marry a rich man and he would drive me around or would hire a chauffeur. Ma taught me I must marry either a doctor or a lawyer. I was always around rich people and have met many stars over the years. I had bodyguards, but they were called uncles or co-workers. © unknown author / Quora

  • When I was a child, I was taught to not tell or show anyone that I was from a rich family because there were people who lived worse than us, and they could feel bad seeing that we were wealthy. Since then, I’ve been shy about asking my parents for something. Every time I start thinking, “I don’t feel comfortable asking for it. I have to choose something cheaper.” Sometimes I’m afraid to wear branded clothes because other people might think that I’m a brat. © trines_diary / Twitter

  • My high school had a lot of rich kids who went there. 95% of the kids were from wealthy or influential families. I happened to be in the 5% of those not from a wealthy family. And it just so happened that my dad’s company helped fund the tuition. There was a guy there, Jerry, who was the son of a billionaire. His father wanted him to run his multi-billion-dollar empire. 2 years prior, Jerry’s dad had summoned him back after he graduated from college to go work for the company. But Jerry didn’t want to face reality just yet, so he spent an extra 2 years “studying,” extending his college experience by getting a master’s degree. Somehow he had convinced his father that whatever degree he was getting would enhance his ability to one day run the family business. In reality, he was just delaying the inevitable. As the firstborn son of one of the largest developers in the world, his fate was sealed. “I’m going to run his business into the ground,” said Jerry shaking his head at his farewell party. © Jay Kim / Quora

Do you have friends who grew up in a wealthy family? What was their life like? Tell us in the comments below.

Preview photo credit Vikki96 / pikabu

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I have a feeling that it's the parents fault for letting their child become a spoiled brat like this

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When I was 14 we moved to a house in a rich area in the mountains of New Jersey. I went to the same High School Meryl Streep went to. We were the poorest of the poor but my next door neighbors were rich. They had a built in swimming pool, mini bikes to ride through their woods, they would go to Hawaii every year in their own plane. They had a super expensive pool table. I know because the two boys around my age, who I had befriended, told me. They had a Renault car just to ride in the fields behind their house. So I figured I had it better because I could use their stuff and just go home. They had to be responsible for everything. Meanwhile, one brother had a rich girlfriend who use to pick him up in her brand new car. She lived on a street named after her family. Every time we went somewhere, she would look at me in the back seat with her boyfriend in the front, and smile a flirty smile at me. Every time. I resisted because I didn't believe in cheating but she never quit. She eventually brought over an 18 year old girl who instantly made me her boyfriend. I was 14! She eventually drifted away. Then a neighbor on the other side of my next door neighbors brought her horse over to pick me up and ride through the woods. As we were riding she violently smacked the horse very hard and screamed at it as it wasn't doing what she wanted it to. That was my last time with her. They all seemed so vacuous and incapable of deep connections. I so felt better off than they were. I think they felt it, too. The father was a big fat cigar smoking character who eventually had a heart attack. He lived but I can't imagine if he had died what they would have done with themselves.

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l worked as a house cleaner at one point at age 16. one of the places l cleaned was for a single dad with 2 girls age 17 & 18, he was a developer of tech products and l was hired by his sister to clean twice a week and cook 5 meals for the week for the 2 girls.
All the girls had to do was pay me at the end of the days, a set amount. Not only did l clean but l had to teach the girls how to use a washing machine. Then once l came in to find bodies everywhere, not a problem until l found a $3,000 bottle of spirits on the table half empty when the youngest casually Swiss from the bottle and commented that she hit the wine cellar for an art project, Wow. But the final straw for me was when 1: they had absolutely no idea about personal hygiene, and 2: they thought everyone was as rich as they were and it would be ok if they paid me the following week. Not Happening! So l called their Aunt, explained the situation and that at their age they should know about personal hygiene etc and accept responsibility for their own actions. Also that as l was only 16 and younger than them, l may not have had their money but l had something better, character, life experience and the knowledge that no matter what l'd survive.

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