Why Piercing Your Baby’s Ears Might Not Be a Good Idea

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, parents should wait for their kids to turn at least 6 months old before they get their ears pierced. While that advice is often debated by parents, there is no denying that there are quite a few disadvantages to piercing your baby’s ears.

Bright Side has dug deeper on the topic and found some points that parents may want to keep in mind.

They could really hurt themselves.

Getting a piercing hurts, no matter the age, but there’s more to it than that. When you pierce your baby’s ears, they might turn red and become really sensitive. It’s crucial to make sure the fresh piercing is not touched. However, babies are unpredictable, and they might try to touch and pull on the earring, which can be a choking hazard.

You’re making their choice for them.

While it’s entirely up to parents whether they want to pierce their baby’s ears or not, there is a risk that the child will grow up and dislike it. Since piercing your ear at any age hurts the same amount, maybe it’s a better choice to let the kid decide on their own when they’re older and are able to take care of their piercings themselves.

It’s permanent.

Even though this isn’t always the case, sometimes a pierced ear might scar the ear tissue and make the hole permanent. A permanent piercing may become a problem if your kid grows up and decides to get rid of the piercing.

They could develop infections.

Even when done with all precautions in mind, infant ear piercings always run the risk of developing an infection unless cared for properly. Pain, discharge, and swelling can appear if the ear isn’t cleaned as directed by the expert, and it can even lead to the formation of a keloid. It’s advised to not remove the piercing for at least 6 weeks after getting it.

At what age did you get your first piercing? Have you pierced your kid’s ears?

Preview photo credit shutterstock.com
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